Why is it so hard to
buy & sell
played with
Redline Hot Wheels?

 

I was thinking about this question recently and came
up with this illustration.

When a person finds their childhood Redline Hot Wheels from 1960's and 1970's they look at them and this is what they see...



Hey that Gold 1968 HK Mustang looks like new!  So it must be worth a lot of money!  Prices guides show $125 to $175 for a Gold Mustang in MINT condition.  Only they don't really exist in MINT condition. 
Hong Kong made hot wheels especially turn dark and icky over time.

BUT HOW DOES A COLLECTOR SEE THIS CAR?







 

To a collector this car has tons of paint chips and dark spotting called "toning".  With a magnifying glass you can count 50 paint chips and rubs or more. 

Here is another example,
an Antifreeze Camaro with a black roof...



 Another good looking car from this distance,
BUT HOW WOULD A COLLECTOR SEE THIS CAMARO?





When a car like this is sold on eBay here is what happens...

If the seller uses the "good" photo the buyer bids up the car and then is disappointed when the car arrives. 

The seller was already disappointed because they thought the cars should sell for a lot more.

The buyer wants a refund but the seller spent the money already.

Now they argue...

This is why even with gigantic eBay selling Hot Wheels 24-7 

ToyCarCollector.com

just keeps going and going, year after year!

Back to the Toy Car Collector

 

 

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